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Golden Axe
Virgin £9.99/14.99 Jan 1991 YS61
Life Expectancy: 85 
Instant Appeal: 91 
Graphics: 90 
Addictiveness: 93 
Overall: 91°  
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Brilliant beat-'em-up with loads of characters, colour and nice little touches. The best of its kind all year.
Linda Barker
Game Footage
Please can I have a dragon? (No. Ed) Just a little one - I could keep it under my desk. It wouldn't be any trouble, honest. (Sorry, Linda, you can't have one.) But I could take it to the park in my lunch hour and train it to drink coffee from the machine. And it'd keep the office warm in winter. (Look, Linda, it just wouldn't fit.) But I only want a little one.
    Oh, okay. I guess I'll make do with this game for the time being. It's got loads of dragons in it, and a dwarf and lovely little blue elves too. Yep, riding dragons and killing people - that's the life for me.
    For the handful of you who don't know, Golden Axe is Virgin's big Christmas coin-op conversion, a highly colourtul two player D&D style beat-'em-up. The arcade original was as playable as, erm, a very playable thing, and the Speccy version is remarkably similar - it has all five horizontally-scrolling levels of the arcader (packed with oodles of baddies), between-level maps outlining your route, and (most impressively) bags of smoothly animated colour. Most of it is set in front of a plain black background which saves on attribute clash - the only time things get hard to see is when you're surrounded by baddies, when it's a bit of a jumble.
    But before we really get into the game there's a bit of a complicated plot bit to explain, I'm afraid. You see, Death Adder and his men have pillaged their way through the kingdom of Yuria (as bad guys do), taking the King and Princess captive. What's more, DA has also got his slimy reptilian mitts on the legendary Golden Axe. It is up to you to... ah, but I'm sure you can guess the rest.
    Before we can get stuck into the fighting though you've got to choose your character. You too can be a barbaric warrior, a flame-haired amazon or a bouncing dwarf, each with a suitably revenge-filled reason for wanting DA dead. All three can manage a handful of fighting moves - slashes, kicks, jabs, and a jump-in-the-air-and-stab-the-rotter-in-the-head-on-the-way-down one, the computer picking the attack it uses each time you press Fire. Beyond that, all the characters have their own individual moves - a shoulder barge for the barbarian, a flying kick for the girlie - and limited magical powers for those tricky moments. These work as sort of smart bombs, wiping out the less powerful baddies on-screen, and knocking wodges of energy off the others. How powerful they are depends on how many bottles of potion you've collected from these rather sweet little blue goblins who run around every now and then, most noticeably in the little bonus bits between levels. Clout one round the head and he'll drop a couple of bottles. Collect them and whammo! Your magic's no longer a weedy series of bangs popping across the screen, but a massive, baddy-crippling explosion of nuclear proportions.
    But let's get on with the game, shall we? The screen won't scroll 'til you've killed off the first lot of baddies, which actually takes some getting to grips with, before developing into a sort of forest affair. What you really want to do is snatch the first opportunity to get yourself a dragon - knock a baddie off one, clamber onto the hot seat and you effectively double (if not triple) your slashing power. Dragons come in various sorts - some flame breathing, some odd chicken-like ones which hit things with their tails - but they're all super-useful to have, especially when taking on the big end-of-level baddies. Watch out though - the baddies will want their mount back!
    At the end of each level big baddies come in two sorts - big white men with swords, and big green and yellow men with hammers - and various combinations. Kill them (it is possible) and you'll get to the next level, which in this case is the Turtle Village (so called because it's built onto the back of a giant turtle, though that's not apparent in the Speccy version). Here you'll take on some really mean chicks with lethal lightning-shaped swords before crossing a bridge to Level Three and Eagle Island (perched on a giant eagle's back) which is populated with Jason And The Argonauts-style skeletons. Eventually you'll get to a castle and your final showdown with slimey old Death Adder himself. Kill him and wa-hey! You're a complete and utter hero.
    You can now sit back, breathe freely and think - wow, what a good game. I know I did. I have no massive niggles with this one at all - it's a painful multiload, the colour clash can be a bit ugly and, despite being bags of fun, the two-player option would be better if the heroes could fight each other (as in the arcade) - but considering the limitations of the Speccy it's great. Plus there are loads of dragons and elves in it. What more could a girl possibly ask for?

Arcade version screenshot...
Arcade screenshot
Click here to view all 9 pics

Ratings given by other magazines
   CRASH  7/10    Sinclair User  7/10   
Crash Review---
Info supplied by the SPOT*ON database

YS Cross-references
 
pGolden Axe/VirginYS57
PRE
 
pGolden Axe (in Super Sega)YS71
 
C
pGolden Axe (in 2 Hot 2 Handle)YS77
70
r
pGolden Axe/TronixYS77
30
Some info from Sinclair Infoseek+SPOT*ON


Life Expectancy
  
Graphics
  
Instant Appeal
  
Addictiveness
Linda Barker has kindly authorised this site
Reviews in other magazines:
     
 
Crash (HTML)
 
Sinclair User
 
     
 
C+VG
 
MicroHobby
 
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